Tag Archives: Ohio

Beer Review: Clown Shoes Galactica & Hoppy Feet

Ohio is receiving lots of distribution from new (to us) breweries at the end of 2013.  New Belgium, Deschutes, and others will be here before the end of the year but it’s getting kicked off with Clown Shoes. Clown Shoes is a contract brewing operation out of Massachusetts that’s known for somewhat insensitive beer names like Tramp Stamp, Lubrication, and Brown Angel. Controversial names haven’t stopped them from making big and interesting beers for a few years distributing them to a variety of states before finally coming here.

Clown Shoes is initially gracing Ohio with 6 different brews: Galactica and Hoppy Feet are here in 4-packs of 12 oz bottles, Chocolate Sombrero, Genghis Pecan, and Muffin Top are all in 22 oz bombers, finally Tramp Stamp is draft only, at least for now. I did a review of a bottle of Tramp Stamp that I brought back from Georgia last year, you can read that here. I also had a bottle of their Chocolate Sombrero which, in short, is a spicy chocolate imperial stout starting out with some heat that slowly builds and adds in rich chocolate as the glass warms.  I have yet to have Genghis Pecan or Muffin Top and my thoughts on Galactica and Hoppy Feet are just below!

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Ohio Hop Farm Research

The Ohio State University has a research farm in Piketon, OH and I was invited to attend an informational meeting on growing hops in Ohio along with a tour of their hop yard.

4 months of first year growth

There are no records of commercial hops operations in Ohio since around 1920. Back then the Ohio crops were virtually wiped out by downy mildew disease, something that is still a concern today… prohibition had to hurt a bit too.

That was nearly 100 years ago and things have hopefully changed for the better. Some may be asking why should THE Ohio State University (OSU), the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) care about hops?

First off they’re a very important part of beer, especially in IPAs which reign supreme among craft beer styes. Take that high demand combined with worldwide shortages in recent years and fewer folks growing less hops on the west coast, America’s current top hop spot.

I'm a poet and everyone wishes I didn't know it!!

Hops cones grow on a bine which grabs to the twine.

OSU cares even more about hops in Ohio due to the locavore trend. For a few years now more and more folks have wanted local produce and everyone wants to know how many of their local brewers ingredients are local. This is a question I’ve thrown at every brewer I’ve interviewed, their response is along the lines of “None, there aren’t any local ingredients available, but maybe some spices here or there.”

If OSU can help Ohio farmers grow Ohio hops then Ohio brewers can give Ohio residents a more local product.

Many folks were interested in what varieties were being tried. The core line up was Cascade, Nugget, Williamette, Columbus, Sterling, and Centennial with Galena, Mt. Hood, Hallertauer tradition, and Spalter Select as additional varieties. Without any doubt Columbus was growing the tallest with the most cones, cones being the part “where the magic happens”.

Cones

I turned to twitter to see if folks had question and provided answers below were I could:

  • @sudsanonymous: Are rhizomes planted at intervals to allow for more frequent harvests?
    • No one is doing this yet but the researchers seemed to think it was a great idea and may try it next year.
  • @L_AllenH: When I buy rhizomes some suggest planting vertically and others horizontally… what is the science behind it?
    • Doesn’t seem to matter because like they say in Jurassic park life will find a way. But do plant two rhizomes per spot to make sure at least one takes.
  • @BeerNFoodLover @rjbedinghaus, and @TyrannyBrewing all asked if farmers were doing whole or pellets and where those whole hops/pellets were for sale.
    • As of right now there are really only 2 people growing more then a few plants. They’ve both worked out arrangements with local brewers near them. One of those arrangements is whole hops, used in dry hoping, in exchange for Jackie O’s growlers… that’s my kind of arrangement. The other guy has a deal worked out with Yellow Springs Brewery, not sure the details there but if it involves Captain Stardust it’s a win!
  • @LooseScrewBeers: Whats the biggest problem they face growing hops in Ohio? Is it bugs? Fungal diseases? Other?
    • No one has seen fungal diseases or bugs yet but downy mildew is starting to set in on some plants, though they should be harvested any day now.

Going a bit further on @LooseScrewBeers question there are two pretty big impediments for Ohio farmers right now. First off they’re looking at about $10,000 per acre invested (not including land or labor) just to get the hops in the ground. Then you have to cut them down, pick them off the bines (not vines), and dry them. All three of those are very labor intensive activities that have yet to be efficiently automated…. though a machine meant for “medical” marijuana is showing some promise. After that $10,000 investment and that labor they’re looking at $2,000 yield the first year, hopefully going up to $7,000 in subsequent years. Which could put them at 3 – 5 years to pay off that initial investment… before making any profit.

I didn’t want to get overly heavy into the research that was done by OSU or the magic of hops; but hit me up if you’re curious and I’ll send you a copy of the material they handed out PLUS stay tuned to the blog because I plan a post on the science of the hop.

Lastly I also found out I’m not mature enough for a discussion about aged natural grass fed cattle fertilizer… which is the fanciest way I’ve ever heard anyone say cow shit.

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El Arco Tequila

 

El Arco bottles

 

“I love my unpaid job” was my facebook status last Thursday afternoon. The reason for this love? I had just come from a lunch time tequila tasting that was provided to me because El Arco Tequila reached out to Queen City Drinks to ask if one of their writers would be interested in sampling their tequila and writing a review. Never one to shirk my duty, I bravely stepped forward.

 

el arco blanco and anejo

El Arco is a newcomer to the craft tequila market. Arco Ventures LLC, a Cincinnati-based tequila distribution company bought Arco del Cabo Tequila, renamed it El Arco and began selling bottles in 2011 I believe. The change in marketing, branding, and investment seems to have them taking off quickly. When you think Cincinnati you don’t normally think tequila. So when we sat down with the owners, former NFL lineman and St. Xavier graduate, Rocky Boiman and Greg Meyer who is vice chairman of the Commercial Real Estate Council of Greater Cincinnati, we were curious as to how this brand would compare to other tequilas. Despite the owner’s connections to Cincinnati, it is clear that El Arco is a true tequila in every sense of the word. El Arco is produced by the Tres Mujeres Distillery in Jalisco, Mexico. It is made from 100% organic blue agave that grows for at least eight years before it is harvested to be made into the tequila. But how does the final product compare to other tequilas? El Arco advertises its taste rating on tequila.net right on the label, an excellent marketing strategy since both the blanco and the añejo are currently rated higher than other well known craft brands like Patron and Cabo Wabo.

I learned about all of this while sitting at a table with the two pours of tequila sitting in front of me waiting to be tasted so my expectations were pretty high by the time I got to actually try the tequila. I have to admit I was not disappointed. The blanco was smooth and really enjoyable to sip. It had a sweet, grassy flavor on the initial tasting with a spicy, spearmint-like finish. Hints of citrus can also be tasted in the flavor. The añejo is aged for a full two years in an oak barrel before being bottled but other than that it is the same product as the blanco and tasting them side by side was fascinating. If you have ever compared white-dog whiskey to bourbon you will know that the aging process radically changes the flavor of the initial product. With this tequila, you can taste a lot of the same flavors between the two different products. The grass is still there, as well as some lighter citrus but the oak transform the spearmint into more of a cinnamon with a hint of dark chocolate.

el arco margarita

 

Rocky and Greg were also kind enough to make us a margarita using El Arco Blanco. Fresh squeezed lime juice, top shelf ingredients, organic agave nectar; it had to be good right? Unfortunately the one thing they didn’t have was a jigger and the result was not optimal. While I am sure that the blanco makes a delicious margarita the one I got was too heavy on the lime for me to evaluate how well the tequila worked in the cocktail. However, if you want to try one yourself I recommend going to Bakersfield where the blanco is the tequila in the premium margarita, or if you are at the Western and Southern Open this week you will see that El Arco is the chief sponsor of the bar were you can order a pitcher of the El Arco ‘Ace’ Margarita. Either way I am sure you won’t be disappointed.

If you want more detail on El Arco you can listen to the whole tasting and hear Greg and Rocky explain their company philosophy on Episode 26 of Bottoms Up With Ginny and Charlie.

 

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Introducing Jackie O’s to Cincinnati!

Up until today the only (as far as I’m aware) place to get Jackie O’s in Cincinnati was at Dutch’s in Hyde Park. Jay Ashmore, owner of Dutch’s, said that he’d been making the trip out to Athen’s, having them bring it all the way, or somewhere in between. Now that they’ve signed with Cavalier life will be getting easier for Jay and we’ll all be getting more Jackie O’s. 

Starting today, August 7th, cans of Firefly and Chomo-Lungma will be available across Cincinnati. However, draft will be limited and I have a feeling Dutch’s may still be the hot spot for  Jackie O’s.

First Josh has some background info on Jackie O’s, after that I’m taking a look at their Firefly Amber and Chomo-Lungma brown. First off here’s Josh:

If you don’t know about Jackie O’s out east in picturesque Athens, Ohio and you are an enjoyer of well-crafted beer, you are doing yourself a disservice. Located in and next door to the old, long-time O’Hooley’s spot on West Union Street, Brad Clark has been kicking out some high-quality, extremely unique beers since 2006 or so. Well-known to the small undercurrent of craft beer enthusiasts interested in non-run-of -the-mill sours and barrel aged beers, the small Brewpub blew up after being featured on the cover of Beer Advocate magazine a couple years ago.

If you’re interested, a full, in-depth history of Jackie O’s can be found on their website.  Their bottle releases are legendary in the craft beer scene and are one of those things you just have to do at least once if  you’re into good company and even better beer. They are typically very well attended and in the four or so I’ve been to, you encounter people from all over  the United States. In the last year or so, they had acquired property and were getting setup to package their product in can format. It looks like that time is upon us.


Beer: Firefly Amber
ABV: 4.5%
Malt: American 2-row, Maris Otter, Pilsen, White Wheat, Special Roast, Cara 8
Hops: Hallertau, Athantum, Cascade

Firefly is our lightest offering at Jackie O’s. We like to refer to it as our gateway ale. Introducing macro drinkers to this beer has proved to be effective in converting them into craft beer drinkers. Seasoned craft beer drinkers also admire the drinkability and soft but wide rage of flavors embedded within this Amber ale. A fusion of Maris Otter, Belgian Pilsen, and American 2-row provide an interesting and complex malty base for this refreshing ale. Lightly roasted malt gives Firefly a biscuit-like finish. Carefully selected hops provide an herbal and mildly citrus aroma and flavor.

Very forward malt aroma of caramel and grains. Initially only a hint of citrus/grass hops that increases as it warms.

Looks like a penny that’s been around for a bit showing off a dingy copper color. Nice third-inch off-white head that hung around for a wee bit before skimming down.

Caramel is the dominate flavor with some citrus hop action, light sweetness, and a moderate level of very balanced bitterness.

Body is medium and has a fair bit of carbonation with it.

Very nice amber ale, not amazing or top of the style by any means but still highly enjoyable and worth trying.


Beer: Chomo-Lungma
ABV: 6.5%
Malt: 2-row, Munich, Crystal 60, Chocolate, Biscuit, Belgian Aromatic, White Wheat, Cara 45
Hops: Warrior, Mt. Hood

This brown ale was brewed to commemorate the Lungevity Everest Expedition. Brian Oestrike the brother of Jackie O’s owner Art, sumitted the unforgiving mountain on May 22nd, 2007. The climb was a vehicle to raise money and awareness about lung cancer. The people of Tibet call Mt. Everest “Chomolungma” this exceptional ale carries on the spirit of the climb. 8 Malts, 2 hops, and twenty pounds of wild flower honey give this ale an exceptional character. Baked muffins, dark fruit, bittersweet chocolate, rich honey and earthy subtle hops caress the palate. Booze soaked chocolate raisins round out the warm finish. Now available in cans.

Very pretty very dark brown with a nice light-tan head showing no signs of going anywhere.

Aroma definitely gives off plenty of malt and nice signs of that honey the description talks about.

Flavor is a bit of a toffee and caramel malt bomb. Some light herbal notes with a fair bit of honey that tastes a little weird, I’m guessing that’s cause it’s wildflower honey.

Body is much lighter than I expected based on color and malt profile.

Not sure I’ve ever heard a better story for naming a beer. Just being named after Mt. Everest alone is pretty sweet in my opinion then on top of that you’ve got the dude climbing Mt. Everest for a lung cancer fund raiser. In the end it’s a nice beer but not one I would quest after and it leaves me questioning why some people get so worked up over Jackie O’s brews.


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Tonic Tours – Cincinnati Brewery Tours

When I went to San Diego for a bachelor party earlier this year we were able to sign up for a local brewery tour which provided a bus, a driver, some water, and tours at each of 3 breweries of our choice (we picked Stone, Green Flash, and Lost Abbey). As soon as we were done with that tour my friends and I began debating and plotting away to do that same thing in Cincinnati.

Luckily someone else has already done that for us making Tonic Tours are the first local tour of breweries that I’m aware of. I’ll let you read Tonic Tours description of the event before we dive into my thoughts:

Tonic Tours is launching public microbrewery tours in Cincinnati. We start at Everything’s d’Vine for an introduction to beer tasting before we drive the van to Rivertown Brewing, Fifty West, and Mad Tree before ending back up downtown at Everything’s d’Vine. Food will be available at Fifty West and water and snacks will be provided along the way. You will learn a little about the past, present, and future of making beer in Cincinnati as well as getting to try some amazing local beer at each stop.

For $90 you get a van ride from Everything D’Vine to Rivertown to 50 West to Madtree and back to Everything D’Vine, a tour and tasting at each brewery, water and snacks in the van, a commemorative glass, and some light food at Fifty West as well. If you want dinner at 50 West (I suggest the C.A.B. sandwich) or more beer at any of the stops then that is extra. Just getting tasting and a tour at Rivertown, 50 West, and MadTree is pretty sweet in itself. If you’ve already been to those then hang tight as the schedule will rotate up every few months.

If you’ve lived here your entire live or are only in town for the weekend this is a great way to discover, or re-discover, Cincinnati’s local breweries! These tours will be running the 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month for $90 a head, you can book your spot over on www.TonicTours.com.

Full Disclosure: I was invited on this tour by Ginny Tonic who comped the tour and all beer, I still paid for my own food. Ginny Tonic is a writer for this blog and I gave her some advice and suggestions to help plan this tour. I will not say that this has in no way impacted my review of the tour since it very well may have. However, I have done my best to be objective and non-biased in the above review. If anyone wants to provide me with things to review I only promise that I will review them and I will write a blog post about them. I do not, under any circumstance, promise a positive review.

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Ohio Girls Pint Out Inaugural Meeting

girlspintout

Girls just want to have beer!

Look out Cincinnati! Lock up your husbands’ and sons’ beer taps because Ohio women have a new drinking club and we are officially open for business. Girls Pint Out is a loosely organized national group with many local chapters but they are all dedicated to bringing together women who love craft beer.

Girls Pint Out originated in Indianapolis, Indiana in early 2010. The Girls Pint Out movement quickly spread to Arizona and Texas with charter chapters. Today, Girls Pint Out has more than 15 chapters nationwide giving women the opportunity to socialize and learn more about craft beer. While educational events are planned with women in mind, our social events are co-ed to encourage craft beer drinkers both male and female to further their journey into the craft beer community.

I was so happy to be able to attend the first meeting of the newly formed Ohio chapter of Girls Pint Out. Terri Houston, the Ohio coordinator of the group, did a fabulous job setting up the event held at Tap House Grill. We had one of the distributors from Mt. Carmel Brewing company there to talk us through a flight of their beer and to answer our questions. We started with a pitcher of the Blonde Ale and I have to say I was very impressed by that one. It was a perfect summer ale; light, refreshing, mildly sweet with a hint of citrus and easy on the hops. I could have drank that all day.

flight of mt carmel beer

We had a nice selection of appetizers to share and of course we also had to have at least one other pint as well. The Tap House does have a pretty decent selection of beers on tap as you might expect from the name. The conversation was great. I got to finally meet Lindsey from Love Beer Love Food as well as hang out with several other good friends. We discussed our favorite types of beer and breweries, and shared the story of how we got into craft beer. A common comment I heard was basically, “I tried beer in college and it was gross so I never really bothered with it. Then one day I tried good beer and a whole new world opened up.” This experience fits nicely into my own theory of why it is that fewer women drink beer. I believe that a great many women and men try the gross stuff when they are new drinkers and think it is disgusting. But since women aren’t expected to like beer anyway and there are alternatives, they head over to Arbor Mist or Mike’s Hard Lemonade and never give beer another thought. Men, on the other hand, probably grew up seeing their dads and other men drinking beer and their friends give them a hard time if they drink something ‘girly’ so they keep chugging the gross beer until they develop a taste for it. But I digress. The point is that this was a super fun event and I hope to see more women at the next Girls Pint Out. The next meet up is July 15th at the Moerlein Lager House. It will include a beer tasting and talk by Brewmaster Richard Dube. The cost is $15 and includes taster samples and some light appetizers. Space is limited for this event, so please reserve your spot today by emailing terri@girlspintout.com or RSVP on the facebook event page. I plan on being there and I hope to see you there too.

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Queen City Drinks One Year Anniversary Party

Reserved for Queen City Drinks.

Reserved for Queen City Drinks.

I just wanted to post a few pictures that Charlie and I took at the Queen City Drinks one-year anniversary party. I don’t know how the other writers feel, but for me it’s been a great experience writing occasionally for this site. My writing has improved as I have tried to make my posts more descriptive and useful to all types of readers, and I have learned so much both through researching stories and from reading everyone else’s posts. Especially about beer and beer related events in Cincinnati. Thanks so much to Josh for getting this website started and for his continued leadership and to Tom for keeping it updated and relevant on a day-to-day basis. And a huge thank you to Fifty West Brewing for hosting this party and for allowing us to bring in our own beer to share. There aren’t many places in Cincinnati that would let you do something like that.  And of course the biggest thank you of all goes to all you readers and brewers reading this who make up the community. It was great getting to finally meet many of you in person Thursday. Now that we know each other in real life and not just on twitter I hope to be seeing a lot more of you. So here are just a few pictures of the night. It was a great time and I had my fair share of beer so they might not all be the best quality but I think that is a sign of a really great evening. Cheers everyone and here is to another great year ahead for Queen City Drinks.

madtree kenny and tom

Looks like an intense discussion

The Brew Professor schools us.

The Brew Professor schools us.

Ginny and Beach bum

Finally meeting the Cincy Beach Bum

2013-05-16 19.37.02

Really nice C.A.B. sliders. So good we ordered them twice.

This was the most sour beer I've ever had.

This was the most sour beer I’ve ever had.

"In the Name of Suffering" sounds more like a hot sauce than a beer.

“In the Name of Suffering” sounds more like a hot sauce than a beer.

Josh at the head of the table. Sort of.

Josh at the head of the table. Sort of.

Triple digit was well represented.

Triple digit was well represented.

Josh and one of the brewer's from Rhinegeist.

Josh and one of the brewer’s from Rhinegeist.

Doesn't have anything to do with beer but on the way home we drove by Horseshoe and stopped to get half of The Killers concert for free by standing outside the gates. Better seats than I've ever had at Riverbend.

Doesn’t have anything to do with beer but on the way home we drove by Horseshoe and stopped to see part of The Killers concert for free by standing outside the gates. Better seats than I’ve ever had at Riverbend.

 

 

 

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Beer Review: Rockmill Tripel

Rockmill is a semi-local brewery from Lancaster, Ohio. Lancaster is about 2 hours from here and slightly south-east of Columbus. They make the somewhat lofty claim that their local water ” is nearly identical in mineral content to that of Wallonia, Belgium, where Belgian ale originated.” They also use all organic ingredients in their beers. I’ve seen the Triple, Dubbel, and Witbier at various locations around town for a while now but have resisted trying them due to the $15 price. I drink a lot of beer and that gets expensive fast so when I’ve always opted for the $10 bomber/750 over the $15 one. I’m not sure why I changed my mind and finally picked this up but I’m glad I did!

Sorry for the poor quality

Brewery: Rockmill Brewery
Beer: Tripel
Style: Belgian Tripl
ABV: 9%
Calories: ~270 per glass

Super dense and cloudy orange brown with skim of white head.

Oh man, ultra pungent flowery aroma jumps out as soon as you pop the cork. Lots of spices, banana, cloves, loads of yeast, bit of bread.

Nice classic tripel flavors showing off some floral hops, much more banana taste, some other fruits like lemon and citrus stuff. Really nice and complex flavor.

Medium body with a pretty smooth feeling and a fair bit of carbonation.

No real sense of the 9% which is nice that you can enjoy this without it being in your face. Super awesomely complex aroma and taste are both very enjoyable. I strongly regret waiting so long to have this. $15 is kinda steep and is why I held off so long but honestly for a very small brewery making beers like this it’s not an unfair price. One thing to note was how hard it was to get the cork out. I’m not sure what that means but I had to get out the wine opener and fight with it a bit. Also kinda accidentally poured the yeast in and didn’t keep it separated too well.

This review was just on their tripel but coincidentally and unbeknownst to me  fellow Cinci beer blogger Queen City Beer Nerd has just posted a review of the dubbel. I picked this bottle up at Jungle Jim’s Eastgate and you can check the Rockmill website for other locations around town as there are a few too many to list here.

I enjoyed this so much that I’m going to find some time this summer to get out to the brewery and try their other beers. I will, of course, let everyone know what I discover out in the rural Ohio countryside!

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Monday Short Pours: Higher Ohio beer ABV?, Madtree gets first beers approved, Dogfish Head Sixty-One

Short Pours are bits of news that we at QCD think are worth your while. Follow the attributed links for the whole story!

Raising the Ohio beer ABV cap:

“State Rep. Dan Ramos, D-Lorain, plans to re-introduce a proposal this year to increase the legal limit on the amount of alcohol allowed in beer sold in Ohio. Right now, the limit is 12 percent alcohol by volume. Ramos’ proposal would boost that to 21 percent.

“Of course, with Ohio’s growing brewing industry, we see this as good for state tax revenue, as consumers won’t cross the border into a neighboring state with less prohibitive restrictions to purchase similar products, and good for business as it allows the industry to continue to grow and distribute its products across the state and country,” Ramos’ legislative aide John Tyler said.”

via Ohio lawmaker plans to seek higher ABV – The Beer Blog – Ohio.

Madtree gets their label approvals…

Madtree Axis Mundi Ale (Russian Imperial Stout)
Madtree Happy Amber Ale
Madtree Gnarly Brown Ale
Madtree Identity Crisis Ale (Black IPA’ish)
Madtree Pyschopathy IPA

[Label pictures after the jump below.]

via Queen City Drinks

And Dogfish Head puts out another wine-beer concoction…

“Sixty-One captures that tradition in a bottle and marries two Dogfish Head innovations: beer/wine hybrids — which Dogfish has focused on for well over a decade with beers like Midas Touch and Raison D’être — and continually-hopped IPAs.

The name Sixty-One is a reminder that this beer is Dogfish Head’s best-selling 60 Minute IPA plus one new ingredient: syrah grape must from California. The label, painted by Sam, is a twist on a typical watercolor. Rather than using water, Sam mixed the green pigment with beer and the red pigment with wine. And because Sixty-One pairs so well with chocolate, he painted the browns on the label with melted chocolate.

Sixty-One, which clocks in at 6.5% ABV, will debut in March. Four-packs will be available four times a year throughout Dogfish Head’s 27-state distribution network.”

Via Dogfish Head

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Beer Review: Rivertown Death

Right, first thing’s first, I’m a little scared and very excited. I’m excited because I love Rivertown and enjoyed both Famine and War, plus I’m all in for high gravity beers. I’m scared because the pepper in this beer, the Jolokia pepper. This thing used to be Guinness World Records hottest pepper in the world, it’s also being used as a weapon by the Indian Army, they’re putting it into grenades. The following table shows various peppers and where they fall in the Scoville unit, the table and all this pepper info is jacked from Wikipedia.

Scoville units Examples
1,500,000–2,000,000 Most law enforcement grade pepper sprayTrinidad Moruga Scorpion
855,000–1,463,700 Bhut Jolokia chili pepper – This is what they used in this beer
100,000–350,000 Habanero chili
50,000–100,000 Bird’s eye chili (aka. Thai Chili Pepper)
30,000–50,000 Cayenne pepper
3,500–8,000 Jalapeño pepper, Chipotle, Tabasco sauce
No significant heat Bell pepper

This is the last of the Brewmaster’s reserve limited release apocalypse series. Here are my previous reviews of Famine and War, unfortunately I missed the boat on Pestilence.

From the label:

Batch No. 4 in The Brewmaster’s Reserve Limited Release Series Death is the fourth of four brews released centered around the Mayan apocalypse of 2012 signifying worlds end on December 21st 2012.

Death is a high gravity Russian imperial stout. Rich malt complexity from a blend of dark malts, paired with Jolokia peppers (Ghost chili peppers) emphasize the finality of the series and the horseman himself. Save one for December 21st 2012.

Time to get drinking!

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