Category Archives: Reviews

Tito’s Handmade Vodka

titos

With so many micro-distilleries popping up around the country I thought it would be nice to review a vodka from one of the early success stories from the micro-distilling movement. Tito’s Handmade Vodka is celebrating its 16th year in business. Tito’s was stared by a guy named Tito Beveridge (with a name like that how do you know go into the alcohol business) who started out making vodka infusions as gifts and somehow ended up founding the first legal distillery in Texas. Since winning a double gold medal in the World Spirits Competition they have come to be known as one of the go-to brands of vodka for people who are serious about cocktails but also aware of price. I have even heard of some up-scale bars and restaurants who are using Tito’s as their well vodka so that the taste of their carefully crafted cocktails don’t get ruined by sub-par vodka. This really is the path that every micro-distiller around the country is hoping to follow, although few of them look ready to compete at this point.

Despite having been aware of the brand for many years I had not actually gotten around to buying a bottle until now. Tito’s is a 100% corn vodka and it does have the characteristic sweet and creamy taste that most of the corn vodka’s I’ve tried also have. But the other corn vodka’s I’ve tried also have a lot more of a flavor to them. And when it comes to vodka that is not necessarily a good thing. Tito’s is incredibly smooth, with a creamy mouthfeel and just a hint of sweetness before you do taste the alcohol at the end. But it is not a burning alcohol and you can drink it without making cheap vodka face and coughing. One reason for the difference is that Tito’s microdistilled in an old-fashioned pot stills and so they have more control over the process than with column stills. I would say it is very similar in character and quality to Buckeye Vodka but is a few dollars cheaper per bottle and, in my opinion,  slightly better. Don’t be put off by the cheap looking bottle and plastic cap. Part of Tito’s mission statement is keeping their product as affordable as possible and they are clearly not investing too much in bottle. Instead they use quality ingredients, a careful distillation process, and then distill it just enough (six times) to get out the impurities and strong corn flavors but not so much that all that is left is the ethanol flavor. So there you have it. If you want to support local vodka at an affordable price go with Buckeye but if you want a bottom line better vodka for an even better price, go with Tito’s.

If you want to listen to a tasting and review of Tito’s you can hear it on this week’s episode of Bottom Up.

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Audacity of Hops [Book Review]

Before even cracking open The Audacity of Hops:The History of America’s Craft Beer Revolution, just totally judging it by it’s cover, I’m psyched. I dig the play on Obama’s Audacity of Hope book (not trying to get political), turning it into Audacity of Hops. It’s also an applicable title as well because this is the story of the American craft beer movement and much of that movement has been pushed by American hops and the usage (or over usage depending on your preference) of them.

The-Audacity-of-Hops

The author starts with a skim through the ancient history of beer, early american beer, and prohibition in a few paragraphs. This is good for two reasons: this info has been covered extensively elsewhere and it allows him to get more in depth with the people, places, and most importantly stories of the American craft beer movement. The Audacity of Hops goes into significant, but not overwhelming, detail about the various reckless gambles around the founding, or expansions, of many breweries as well as the contexts of the time for people and beer. The author makes this retelling enjoyable and engaging, there are plenty of facts sprinkled throughout but not page after page of yearly quantities and revenues I’ve encountered in other books.

However the book tends to be heavy with hyperbole, especially with the early home brewers. The author makes it seem that these men, Jack McAuliffe and Fred Eckhardt, birthed a brand new discovery to the universe with herculean effort. While in reality they only did what people around the world had done for millenia, brew beer at home. Now I don’t want to diminish their efforts, they certainly broke the law of the land at the time and did something few had done in 30 years and those who had done it recently hadn’t done it well.

The book could, at quite a few points, do with better editing. The author has a tendency to run on about random breweries that didn’t survive beyond a year or two. Should they be mentioned? Certainly, otherwise there could appear a nonstop success with no failures. However, they don’t each need 3 or 4 pages. We also don’t need 2 paragraph biographies of every single brewer nor do we need them repeated frequently. I think by the end of the book I’d read a description of Fritz Maytag (owner and resuscitator of Anchor) at least 10 times.

At first I was doubtful but the structure of the book has proven itself to work well. That structure is mainly chronological but also, more importantly, geographical. We move through the years hoping across the United States and occasionally over seas. From San Francisco to New York, Juneau, Boulder, Baghdad and back. This works to tell how the craft beer story is an American one and isn’t just in California (though they can rightfully claim the birthplace).

I enjoyed reading this and think that many fans of craft beer will enjoy it as well. It’ll gives you a long list of new beers to try and a concise history of American craft brewers and breweries that I haven’t found elsewhere. Plus some fodder for arguments over contract brewing, the importance of brewery X vs brewery Y, and “How dare he not include [insert favorite local/regional brewery here]!”.

Lastly, I have a new favorite beer quote & motto for what I try to do with the blog:

“I still see people buying and swilling terrible beer. I sometimes think my job is like farting against a gale, but I just keep moving forward”

– Michael Jackson.

You can pick this up on Amazon at $15 for the paperback version or $10 for kindle. It should also be available at any other bookstores.

FULL DISCLOSURE: I reached out to the author and his publisher was kind enough to hook me up with a free copy. To our readers, and any companies interested in sending me stuff, giving me free stuff impacts the review in only 2 ways. That I WILL review it and that and I WILL write a blog post about it. Giving me free stuff does not guarantee you a favorable review or that I will tell everyone to go buy it.

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Beer Review: Dogfish Head Midas Touch

This right here is not your normal beer origin story. The folks at Dogfish Head have recreated this beer based off chemical residue on a 2,700 year old artificat found in the tomb of King Midas. Dogfish Head teamed up with a molecular archaeologist to decode this residue into the ingredients from which they created the recipe for this exotic brew. Continue reading

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Sorachi Ace

Brooklyn Brewery’s Sorachi Ace is a rather unique and special beer. Many brews are made with a combination of hop varieties this beer is very different as it uses 1 single hop from which it takes it’s name, the sorachi ace. While many hops are hundreds of years old and were found growing wild, not so for the sorachi ace. It was custom engineered by Sapporo in Japan in the late 70s from a combination of brewer’s gold and saaz hops, both classic varieties. Sorachi ace also shows off one final unique characteristic by having a flavor of lemon and dill, different then the citrus/grapefruit/grass action of many hops.

So Brooklyn Brewery took this unique hop and used it in the somewhat special style of saison. Saisons are a complex style with a wide range of possible profiles, however, most are dry, moderate strength beers that are refreshing on hot summer days. They’re the second runner up for summer beers next to wheat beers like Bell’s Oberon and Sam Adam’s Summer Ale. Per the Brooklyn Brewery website Sorachi Ace is “a cracklingly dry, hoppy unfiltered golden farmhouse ale, but made entirely with now-rare Sorachi Ace hops grown by a single farm in Washington.”

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Review: Quaff Bros Big Kahuna

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Coconut beers always seem to be a disappointment to me. It always just seems to be a hint of coconut, leaving me wanting more. After drinking Big Kahuna from our buddies Quaff Bros across the river (though brewed on this side at Listermann), I can safely say that this is no longer the case. Utilizing coconut flakes, toasted coconut, and coconut oil, this beer essentially tastes like it has been aged inside of a giant coconut that previously housed bourbon.

It starts off looking like every other stout, porter, etc. in the world. The only differentiating figure looks-wise is the Coca Cola head on it; big brown bubbles. It gave me pause for a moment because I was under the impression that fatty coconut kills head retention. I guess not always. From the smell alone, you know that you’re going to be in for a treat if you’re a fan of coconut. For just about the first time I’ve experienced with a Quaff Bros beer, the barrel takes the back seat here. In the driver’s seat (and probably the passenger’s, as well) is COCONUTBourbon is in the child seat in the back and the base beer (an imperial porter for those who care), is bound and gagged in the trunk.

The taste, following this trend, is dominated by coconut, with a slight butterscotch flavor either from barrel or base beer. It’s tough to tell. The bourbon is even more muted in the flavor, though to be fair, barrel characteristics often include coconut notes, so it’s entirely possible this is getting lost. Also strange is a slight lactic twang on the finish. I have not the slightest idea what would lend this, but I don’t care for it.

The coconut here is obnoxious and somewhat reduces drinkability (in my modest opinion, of course), but that’s the whole point. It’s supposed to be obnoxious. This is a good, not great, beer, but I am happy that I have another bottle. If I’m going to buy a unique beer, I’d much rather make it a local one than one Sam has recreated from some terracotta pot in a third world country. I know there are a handful of people whose palates I respect who really enjoyed this, but I’m having a tough time putting it on the same level as Sour Grapes, Joseph, and a few other top tier Quaff beers. Maybe it’s just that I don’t appreciate coconut enough. Who knows.

There are still more than fifty bottles of this at Party Source, and if you and a buddy go in on it together, at $9.99 a bottle it won’t cost you more than buying a drink at the bar. Needless to say, if you’re a fan of coconut, you owe it to yourself to get over there and pick up the maximum of four bottles you’re allowed to buy.

P.S. In other cool Quaff Bros news, their “Corn on the Knob” will be on draft at Great American Ballpark on June 14 when the Reds take on the Milwaukee Brewers.

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Beer Review: Rivertown Lambic (2012 + 2011)

Lambics are some what of an interesting style, mostly because of the funk taste but also the nature of the open air fermentation. Back in Belgium, back in the the old days, brewers would leave their vats of beer open and whatever floated by would settle into the beer. The region in Belgium famous for lambics was lucky enough to have some very special yeast floating through the air that gave it this distinctive funk. Of course they didn’t know about yeast and all that back then. Today those special stains of yeast are added in instead of letting them float on by, at least I hope they are. The other qualification for a lambic is a 30% wheat grain bill. Then they are often aged in barrels before bottling once in the bottle they receive a secondary fermentation to keep them going for years to come!

In fact the owners of Rivertown, Jason Roeper and Randy Schiltz, were home brewing lambic style beers for many years before starting RTB. One of Jason’s home brewed Lambic style beers won the Sam Adams Long Shot competition in 2009 (Boston Beer Company now owns that specific recipe) but the current one is very close. Once the brewery got up and running they made it a priority to keep the lambics rolling and have been releasing a yearly batch ever since. On top of that they’ve expanded their sours to include an old sour cherry porter, Ojos negros (a wild ale), and a gueuze (a blending of 2 vintages of lambic).

Beer: Lambic (2012)
Style: Lambic
ABV: 6.3%
Calories: ~189

Nice hazy amber brown color that revels a hint of gold when held up to light, actually quite a pretty brew. I didn’t get any head even off of a more aggressive pour. There were initially quite a few bubbles but they popped away quickly.

The wild, barn yard-esk, smell pairs well with this lipizzaner stallion thing that happens to be on PBS tonight. There are quite a few other small things I’m picking up like some kind of wood, I think it’s oak that they age it in, and of course some sourness.

The first sip of any sour always reminds me of Vincent Price’s line from Thriller “the funk of 40,000 years” which is, in my opinion, an almost perfect way to describe many sours. Though in this case it’s just the funk of 1 year, because that’s how long it was aged. Plenty of tart sourness that throws your tongue for a loop and makes your head shutter a bit. There is more of that oak wood flavor as well as some bread action and lemon zest.

The body is on the light side of medium and there is light carbonation.

One quick note on the label, if you notice it says 2012 on there, but wait… this just came out and it’s 2013, what’s the deal?? Well this beer was brewed in 2012, stashed in oak barrels to age, then bottled and distributed in 2013. I don’t love sours but I do really enjoy shaking up my palate with one of these every once in a while and I can fully appreciate the styles. Sadly many can’t and I hope that changes, it certainly seems to be changing across the craft beer scene. Sours are becoming more popular and produced more often across the country. The sweet thing about having Rivertown make so many nice sours is that they’re easy to get for us, this is currently available at the brewery and is, or will be soon, at stores around town. Another great thing with Rivertown in town is that sours age fantastically, so without further delay I present today’s review of last year’s lambic!

Beer: Lambic (2011)
Style, ABV, and Calories are the same

Pours a curious combo of orange brown and a bit of yellow, kind of like dark honey. Again very hazy but this time around it started with a nice white head but that quickly faded into a ring of tiny bubbles around the edge of the glass.

Picking up more citrus along with that barnyard, funk, and bread. Like eating a fresh biscuit while riding a horse in an orange grove.

Far less of that tart sour kick it to the palate like before. The year in the bottle has really mellowed this out. Still plenty of funky sour flavor along with some lemon citrus, and malt biscuit action.

Plenty of carbonation tickles my tongue while the medium body slides across it.

This is a much more preferable brew to me. Plenty of that funk but none of that initial shock as it hits your lip. Aging is really very beneficial to this beer and I strongly encourage folks to pick up at least 2 bottles, 1 for now and 1 for the cellar. Also may want to pick up 1 to trade. Now you may be saying “dang, I didn’t think ahead last year and didn’t buy 1 to agree. Woe is me!” luckily for you Belmont Party Supply in the Dayton planned ahead for just such an event last year and still have plenty of the 2011 left, hence the ugly vintage 2011 sticker on the bottle shown.

And if you want to go back even farther here is Josh’s review of Rivertown’s 2010 Lambic. I’d like to try one of those today to see what 3 years has done to it!

Many thanks to Randy Schiltz for helping me out with some facts, oh and for brewing this beer!

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Listermann/Triple Digit dinner at Parker’s Blue Ash Tavern

I was lucky enough to get invited to this beer dinner at Parker’s Blue Ash Tavern featuring the brews of Listermann and Triple Digit. Before we go any farther a bit of background on Listermann and Triple Digit. Listermanns has been a home brew store for a long time now then 5 years ago they started a small brewery aptly named Listermann Brewing Company. Wanting to experiment more they then created a separate brewery know as Triple Digit Brewing company, so named for all their beers having a original gravity in the triple digits. So they’re both brewed at the same place and on the same equipment but are “different” breweries.

I’ve said it before and I’ll again repeat that I’m no food blogger but I’ll do what I can on that front. I will, however, be focusing on the brews and how well they pair with the courses. As for the restaurant I’d never been to Parker’s Blue Ash Tavern before but have seen how they’ve been improving their craft beer selection lately. I quickly checked on the way in and saw at least 8 taps of craft plus a standard sized color case full of craft bottles.

First Course:
Tuna Tacos (Cucumber Salsa, Jalapeno Crema, Cilantro) 
paired with a Serpentine Wheat.
Beer: Listermann Serpentine Wheat
Style: Wheat Ale
ABV: 5.5%
IBU: 18
Ingredients: 2 row pale, wheat malt, oats; sterling and sorachi ace hops; American ale yeast

Little bit darker than most wheats with much more orange color. Nice light aroma of wheat that reminds me of summer days. Very crisp taste with light citrus flavors, but not really the typical IPA type of citrus more lemony than that. Very light body and smooth mouth feel with plenty of carbonation bubbling across your tongue and almost no sense of alcohol. Super refreshing on a hot day.

The heat from the Jalapeno meets up well with the cool soothing wheat but it’s was still a pretty hot dish… Or I’m getting old and losing my joy/tolerance of spicy food.

Second Course:
Fish & Chips (Battered Pacific Cod, Crispy Plantain, Napa Cabbage) 
Beer: Listermann Leopold.
Stye: Belgian blonde
ABV: 6.2%
IBU: 26
Ingredients: Pilsner malt, wheat, flaked corn; Sterling hops; Belgian yeast
Availability: draft only

Extremely light pale yellow, could be mistaken for a Bud Light. Strong flavors from the Belgian yeast strand brings out aromas of fruit. The flavor profile matches the aroma strongly of fruit and lots of grapes specifically. Uber light body and mild carbonation. Really flavorful beer showing off loads of fruit.

The meal was infused with Leopold in multiple ways and tasted great with it.

Third Course:
Beer Belly & Pork Rinds (Smoked Pork Belly, Spicy Pork Rinds, Avocado) 
Beer: Listermann Jungle Honey
Style: American Pale Ale
ABV: 5.7%
IBU: 40
Ingredients: 2-row, crystal, and honey malt; perle and zythos hops; American Ale yeast
Availability: Draft only 😦

Orange brown color topped with slight head. Complex aroma mixing the bitter and sweet. Flavor hits you with a touch of bitterness then a wave of sweetness. Medium body and finish. I really enjoyed the flavor of this brew.

Really awesome combo with the beer and food here. Fatty pork flavors of the meat were washed away by the IPA cleansing the palate for another bite.

Entree Course:
Ohio Steak & Potatoes (Ribeye Two Ways, Asparagus, Roasted Beef Jus)
Beer: Triple Digit Aftermath
Style: Scottish Wee Heavy
ABV: 10.5%
IBU: 25
Ingredients: 2 row, crystal, victory, and chocolate malts; brewers gold hops; ale yeast
Availability: 22 oz bottles and limited release draft

Dark brown mahogany color. Strong caramel and toasted bread aromas. Matching flavor with loads of alcohol, but not aggressive or in your face. Fuller body with a creamy mouth feel. Very enjoyable, but you should only do so with caution!

Sorry, this food looked to delicious to wait to take a picture. Super awesome Ribeye, Asparagus, and fried Potatoes which goes great with this strong beer.

Dessert Course:
Nutty Bars (Fresh Peanut Butter, Wafers, Chocolate)
Beer: Listermann Nutcase
Style: Peanut butter porter
ABV: 6.7%
IBU: 28
Ingredients: 2 row pale, aromatic, crystal, Chocolate, flaked oat malts; brewers gold hops; American ale yeast.

Very dark brown color. Nuts are all over the place here strong in the aroma and flavor. If you don’t like peanut butter you might want to stay away. I on the other hand love peanut butter and always say the world needs more porters, resulting in this beer being a great combo for me.

Super delicious but almost a little too rich. Think about those vanilla wafer sandwiches, just in a peanut butter flavored and ultra gourmet version.

Not getting down to Norwood (where the Listermann/Triple Digit brewery is) very often I have few chances to try these Listermann brews. Since Triple Digit is bottled and distributed more widely I’m much more familiar with their line up and have had Aftermath quite a few times. This is something that will have to change. I was seriously wowed by the Jungle Honey and need to get around to giving it a full review and making sure to get it more often.

If you’ve been looking for an excuse to do the same then this Saturday is that excuse, especially if you like hazelnuts! From 10 am – 10 pm it’s officially Chickow! Day at the brewery, featuring a release of Bourbon Barrel Chickow! as well as many different variations on tap and cask. I also hear it’ll be easier to acquire a variety of Triple Digit in the future as they’re getting a bottling line (they’ve been hand bottling everything) and will be releasing 4 and 6-packs as well as the 22 oz bombers they currently carry!

FULL DISCLOSURE: I was invited to this event by a PR firm and my meal was comped, so all food and beer were free. To our readers, and any breweries interested in inviting me to events, giving me free beer impacts the review in only 2 ways. That way is that I WILL review the beer and I WILL write a blog post about it. Giving me free beer does not guarantee you a favorable review or that I will tell everyone to go buy it or anything like that.

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Beer Review: Rockmill Tripel

Rockmill is a semi-local brewery from Lancaster, Ohio. Lancaster is about 2 hours from here and slightly south-east of Columbus. They make the somewhat lofty claim that their local water ” is nearly identical in mineral content to that of Wallonia, Belgium, where Belgian ale originated.” They also use all organic ingredients in their beers. I’ve seen the Triple, Dubbel, and Witbier at various locations around town for a while now but have resisted trying them due to the $15 price. I drink a lot of beer and that gets expensive fast so when I’ve always opted for the $10 bomber/750 over the $15 one. I’m not sure why I changed my mind and finally picked this up but I’m glad I did!

Sorry for the poor quality

Brewery: Rockmill Brewery
Beer: Tripel
Style: Belgian Tripl
ABV: 9%
Calories: ~270 per glass

Super dense and cloudy orange brown with skim of white head.

Oh man, ultra pungent flowery aroma jumps out as soon as you pop the cork. Lots of spices, banana, cloves, loads of yeast, bit of bread.

Nice classic tripel flavors showing off some floral hops, much more banana taste, some other fruits like lemon and citrus stuff. Really nice and complex flavor.

Medium body with a pretty smooth feeling and a fair bit of carbonation.

No real sense of the 9% which is nice that you can enjoy this without it being in your face. Super awesomely complex aroma and taste are both very enjoyable. I strongly regret waiting so long to have this. $15 is kinda steep and is why I held off so long but honestly for a very small brewery making beers like this it’s not an unfair price. One thing to note was how hard it was to get the cork out. I’m not sure what that means but I had to get out the wine opener and fight with it a bit. Also kinda accidentally poured the yeast in and didn’t keep it separated too well.

This review was just on their tripel but coincidentally and unbeknownst to me  fellow Cinci beer blogger Queen City Beer Nerd has just posted a review of the dubbel. I picked this bottle up at Jungle Jim’s Eastgate and you can check the Rockmill website for other locations around town as there are a few too many to list here.

I enjoyed this so much that I’m going to find some time this summer to get out to the brewery and try their other beers. I will, of course, let everyone know what I discover out in the rural Ohio countryside!

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St Germain Liqueur

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This week for the Bottoms Up podcast I decided to combine the domestic and the foreign to make a summer cocktail that actually perfect for Mother’s Day. First we taste and discuss St. Germain, a French elderflower liqueur that also happens to be one of the most beautiful and romantic bottles I’ve ever seen. St. Germain has a delicate floral taste that is really unlike any other flavor but lychee crossed with a grapefruit comes close. It is light and less sweet than most liqueurs so it mixes well with just about everything. The price is expensive, about $40 a bottle, but you only use an ounce or less for most recipes and the flavor is so unique that I do recommend having a bottle in your liquor cabinet. And if you don’t think it is worth the price, just read their website:

FOR A FEW fleeting spring weeks, we gather exclusively fresh, wild blossoms for your cocktail. The blossoms in question are elderflowers, and the cocktail a stylishly simple creation made with St-Germain, the first liqueur in the world created in the artisanal French manner from freshly handpicked elderflower blossoms. Our story, however, does not end there.

AFTER gently ushering the wild blossoms into sacks, and descending the hillside, a few of the men who gather blossoms for your cocktail, will then mount a bicycle a carefully ride the umbrells of starry white flower to a collection depot. Vraiment. In a matter of weeks, we will have gathered what will become St-Germain for that year.

TO PUT THIS IN CONTEXT, we can safely say that no men will be wandering the hillsides of Poland this spring gathering wild potatoes for your vodka. Likewise, we know of no Bavarians planning to scour the German countryside in search of exotic native hops and barley for your beer. Yes, in this day and age St-Germain is exceedingly special and rare. Consequently, we are able to hand make only very limited quantities.

AND WHAT OF THE TASTE of St-Germain? It has been said that Paris is a mélange curieux, a curious mixture of flavors, styles and influences. So it is with St-Germain. Neither passionfruit nor pear, grapefruit nor lemon, the sublime taste of  St-Germain hints at each of these and yet none of them exactly. It is a flavor as subtle and delicate as it is captivating. A little like asking a hummingbird to describe the flavor of its favorite nectar. Très curieux indeed, n’est-ce pas?

And on top of all that, it tastes great. The cocktail I made for the show using St. Germain, dubbed the “Elder Whimsy” by Charlie, is made with a strawberry infused vodka that I made a few weeks ago but you could make it with a strawberry flavored vodka off the shelf just as easily. The result was a lovely summertime drink that would be perfect for Mother’s Day.  Give it a try and tell me what you think.

The Elder Whimsy 

2 oz Strawberry Infused Vodka
1 oz St. Germain

Shake over ice and pour into a cocktail glass.
Top with a splash of club soda. Garnish with a twist of lemon.

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Beer Review: Victory Silverback

After my recent post on Victory’s Storm King imperial stout the comments on reddit brought to my attention a delicious idea I’d never heard before. Turns out that at the Victory brewery you can order a beer called a Silverback, now you won’t find this on any store shelves, it’s a mixture of half Victory Golden Monkey and half Victory Storm King. The white head from the Monkey on top of the black body from the Storm King give this brew it’s Silverback name. I’ve had a black and tan before, Guinness stout & Bass pale ale, and quite enjoyed them. However I have no idea what to expect from a stout and a Belgian tripel except for one thing; both of these beers are over 9%,so I will be drunk!

I poured the Golden Monkey first and ended up using a bit more then half of that before I got to the Storm King. I’d read that this didn’t separate this well like Black & Tans so I tried a trick and poured the Storm King on a spoon over the Monkey, as you’ll see it didn’t layer well either.

Very interesting appearance for sure. Kind of a dark brown or purple color beverage with a milky white head with streams of brown from the Storm King.

Woah, pungent aroma with plenty of roasty malt action as well as some flowery hops. Oh and a strong dose of alcohol.

Taste is curious as well definitely picking more of the stout here then the tripel. Strong malt body and taste with citrus and pineapple hops not found in any other stout I’ve encountered. Hints of chocolate, caramel, orange peel, and lots of “zest”.

Holy carbonation Batman! I’ve had fresh soda flatter than this, man those are some tingly bubbles, all riding atop a smooth medium body.

This has to be one of the most interesting beers I’ve tried. Not nearly my favorite by any means but most interesting for sure, no style has ever come close to this menagerie of taste and flavors. They’re good and all but not great, and that carbonation is a little over powering. This is certainly worth a try just bring a friend to split it with. Remember what’s interesting isn’t always the same as what’s good.

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